31st Annual International Festival “INDIGENEITY”

31st Annual International Festival “INDIGENEITY”

Tuesday, March 12

9:15-10:30
Kopiko 127B and 128
THERE’S SOMETHING FUNNY ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE
Guest Speaker: Peterson Toscano. In a lively, stand-up show, this international human rights scholar shares creative approaches to the world’s most important problem, climate change. He skillfully transitions into multiple characters and draws connections between climate change, human rights, & history. Hilarious, thoughtful, and full of hope, Peterson is visiting Hawaiʻi on a SEED diversity grant through the UH System Office of Sustainability.

9:15-10:30 
Lama Library Alcove
ALANI APIO: A LITERARY READING AND TALK
Alani Apio, author of Kāmau and Kāmau ʻAe, will read and talk about his work. Kāmau has been performed locally by Kumu Kahua and internationally at the Festival of Pacific Arts & Culture. Hosted by Porscha dela Fuente and Gail Harada.

10:45-12:00 
Lama Library Alcove
HULA KIʻI : THE ART OF HAWAIIAN PUPPETRY
Guest speaker: Cultural Practitioner and kumu hula (master hula teacher) of Halau o
Kahiwahiwa in the District of Puna, Hawaiʻi and Halau o Moana-nui-a-Kiwa in Aotearoa (New Zealand), Kumu Auliʻi Mitchell is a student of his mother and kumu hula Harriet Aana Mitchell and his grandfather loea Charles Kahiwahiwa Cash. He holds a Masters in Applied Indigenous Knowledge. Rare and interesting, Kumu Auli‘i is dedicated to the carving, the dance and the perpetuation of what is considered to be one of the dances of old, the hula ki‘i or Hawaiian puppetry.

11:00-12:00
Ohi‘a Tent
MUSIC IS OUR PASSION, MUSIC IS LIFE
Highlighting the varied ethnic background of the class members, the Kapiʻolani Community College (Kapi‘olani CC) MUS 206 Synthesizer Ensemble, directed by Anne Craig Lum, will perform music from Germany, Holland, China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Hawai‘i.

12:15-12:45  
Lama Library Char Room
CANTONESE OPERA: FRAGRANT SACRIFICE
Performed by Albert and Lisa Au. During the tumultuous final days of the last Ming Emperor Sung Ching, he ordered Princess Cheung-Ping to select a consort at a ceremony. Chow Sai-Hin captured the heart of the Princess, but the ceremony was interrupted by the Manchu’s invasion. In order to obtain a royal funeral for her father, and to release the crown prince from prison, Princess Cheung had to hold her wedding ceremony in the Ching Palace. The play ends dramatically.

1:00-3:00 
Lama Library Alcove
FILM SCREENING: “LEITIS IN WAITING”
Hosted by Kelli Nakamura, Kapi‘olani CC.
Guest Speaker: Joe Wilson, Director Co-Producer/Director, Dean Hamer
In Tonga, there is a longstanding community of transgender women known as leitis, who have a proud history of dedicated service to the royal family. Over the course of an eventful year, LEITIS IN WAITING follows Joey, a devout Catholic of noble descent, as she organizes a beauty pageant, garners the support of a Royal Princess, and spars with American-financed evangelicals. With extraordinary access to the Kingdom’s royals and religious leaders, this film reveals what it means to be different in a society ruled by tradition, and what it takes to be accepted without forsaking who you are.

6:30‑8:45
Olona 201
INTERNATIONAL FILM NIGHT
1987: When the Day Comes (2018 Korean film)
This film is a sequel to the hit Korean film, Taxi Driver shown at last year’s festival, that depicted the 1980 Democracy uprising in Gwangju. The 1980 Gwangju Uprising sparked the fall of the military dictatorship in South Korea, which gave birth to the democratic South Korea of today. Introduction by Kalani Fujiwara, Kapi‘olani CC Political Science.

Wednesday, March 13

9:15-9:50 
Lama Library Alcove
THE LOSS OF A LANGUAGE
Guest Speakers: Leah Pappas & Olivia Biarchini from the Language Documentation Training Center (UHM). Nearly half of the world’s languages are projected to disappear by the end of the 21st century. Why is this happening and does it matter? Join the LDTC directors in exploring this issue & how you can support language diversity.

9:55-10:30
Lama Library Alcove
INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES IN MALAYSIA
Guest Speaker: Katherine Strong (UHM) “Serau Ta: Indigenous Languages of Borneo”. Borneo is home to three countries, 21.3 million people, and over 100 languages! Celebrate its incredible indigenous linguistic diversity with a special focus on Serau Tet Kanowit (‘language of the Kanowit people’), who have been collaborating with the presenter on a language documentation project. Share in stories of cultural & linguistic agein (‘pride, joy’), while also discussing the impact of dominant languages like Malay, English, and Chinese.

11:00-11:30 
Ohi‘a Tent
UKULELE SOUL BY KARLIE G
Karlie Goya has won numerous ukulele/vocal competitions such as the prestigious Ukulele International Contest, Duke’s Ukes, and Brown Bags to Stardom. Karlie performs a wide range of genres such as traditional/contemporary Hawaiian, Pop, R&B, and Japanese songs.

11:30-1:30
Lama Library Foyer
POSTER SESSION ON INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES
ESOL 94 students will present posters on endangered languages and efforts 2nd level to preserve these languages for future generations.

12:15‑1:30
Olona 202
THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON KPOP
Guest Speaker: Patrick Patterson, History, Honolulu CC. In this presentation, our guest speaker will show how the success of K-pop and J-pop music globally has been carefully planned, well subsidized, and follows patterns that have been developed in a global music market since the 1920’s.

1:30-2:30
Lama Library Alcove
BIOCULTURAL DOCUMENTATION: LINGUISTICS MEETS ETHNOBOTANY
Mike Ross (Ethnobotany, Kapi‘olani CC) and Gary Holton (Linguistics, UH Mānoa) present ways that indigenous knowledge can be preserved through multidisciplinary collaborations such as in the fields of Linguistics, Botany, and Anthropology.

2:30-4:30 
Lama Library Alcove
WE STILL LIVE HERE: AS NUTAYUNEAN DOCUMENTARY
Dreams of her Wampanoag ancestors inspired Jessie Little Doe Baird to revive her extinct language. Her quest led to an MA in Linguistics at MIT. She returned the language to her people, and her daughter is the first native speaker in over 100 years! Hosted by Elaina Malm, Kapi‘olani CC.

6:30‑8:45 
Olona 201
INTERNATIONAL FILM NIGHT
About Love (2005 Pan-Asian film) Three directors from Japan, Taiwan, and China present their interpretations in three vignettes about cross-cultural love in three different cities (Tokyo, Taipei, and Shanghai). How does love bring people from different cultures and language together? Introduction by Kalani Fujiwara, Kapi‘olani CC Political Science.

THURSDAY, MARCH 14

9:15-10:30 
Lama Library Alcove
THE LINGUISTS (2005): A POIGNANT CHRONICLE
The Linguists is a documentary film addressing issues such as the spread of major global languages and how they contribute to language extinction, especially some of the political and social reasons that some languages have been repressed. This film illustrates reasons why language revitalization and language documentation are important.

10:45-12:00 
Lama Library Alcove
NALU I KA MAULI OLA– Being an Indigenous Serving Institution
Guest Speakers: Panelists will discuss the college’s identity as an Indigenous Serving Institution. Mark Kunimune, EMS Program Director; Lisa Kobuke, Associate Professor of Japanese; Porscha dela Fuente, Assistant Professor of English; Kelli Brandvold, Human Resources Manager; and Brian Furuto, Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services.

11:00-1:00
Lama Foyer
ETHNOMUSICOLOGY : A WORLD OF MUSIC
Try out various world musical instruments and learn about world music. Presented by Beryl Yang and students of MUS107.

11:45‑12:15 
Ohi‘a Tent
DANCES OF THE MIDDLE EAST (MEDAH)
Guest Performers: Middle Eastern Dance Artists of Hawai‘i (MEDAH) is devoted to creating and supporting the educational, cultural and entertainment aspects of Middle Eastern dance, music, related musicians, tribal and fusion styles. MEDAH supports and encourages students, teachers, artists, & persons interested in celebrating Middle Eastern dance and music. Dances include Renée–Egyptian folkloric, Jahara– Egyptian cabaret, Sahara Spirit –American Tribal Style, Helenka-Spanish Arabesque Fusion.

11:00-2:00  
Great Lawn
PI DAY: MARCH 14 IS 3.14 OR PI DAY!
Engineers for a Sustainable World invites you to celebrate math and science in an international celebration of the mathematical constant π. Grab a slice of pizza π (pie), participate in our pie (π) eating contest, and play fun games. Come and learn about the scientific accomplishments of Native Hawaiian, indigenous, women, and other underrepresented minorities. For example, did you know that pre-contact Native Hawaiians recorded designs and shapes on the sacred Kūkaniloko Birth Site stones that may have been used to accurately track the movements of celestial objects? Or that they engineered one of the worldʻs most sophisticated aquacultural fishponds (lokoʻia) with walls that withstand the impact of waves for hundreds of years? No math or science skills are required to participate!

6:30‑8:45 
Olona 201
INTERNATIONAL FILM NIGHT – The Third Murder (2018 Japanese film)
Japan Academy Award winner for 2018 – Director Hirokazu Koreeda’s suspenseful courtroom drama is an acute examination of the many facets of human nature and the deep potential for good and evil. How do we communicate the concept of justice when human nature compels us to delve into our baser instincts? Introduction by Kalani Fujiwara, Kapi‘olani CC Political Science.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has designated 2019 the

International Year of Indigenous Languages

About 40% of the world’s 7000 languages are in danger of becoming extinct within the next 100 years. With the disappearance of a language, not only does that community lose its cultural heritage, but its very identity is threatened. Language death can also lead to the loss of indigenous knowledge of the natural environment as well as unique linguistic features that have yet to be documented and described. Because language loss is often not voluntary, its loss frequently involves the oppression of the human rights of minority speakers.

Many organizations have signed on as partners, such as ‘Ōiwi TV, Mokuola Honua, Linguistic Society of America and many others, to help advance the mission of the International Year of Indigenous Languages which includes raising awareness of the plight of indigenous peoples, cultures and their languages.

https://en.iyil2019.org/
http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/
http://www.endangeredlanguagefund.org/
https://www.linguisticsociety.org/content/what-endangered-language
https://www.pbshawaii.org/tag/oiwi-tv/
http://mokuolahonua.com/

IYIL Events Coordinated by Susan Inouye, Professor of Linguistics, Kapi‘olani Community College

 

 

A full PDF version of this schedule is available.

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