Chancellor’s Corner Issue No. 4

Chancellor’s Corner Issue No. 4

On the Road Again: Japan and Hong Kong

October-November 2016

As the Interim Chancellor of Kapi‘olani Community College, one of my responsibilities is promoting International Education, a signature program at the College. Because of my past experience as a volunteer with Canadian University Services Overseas in Papua New Guinea and as a former F-1 visa international student, I welcome the responsibility for international education. I know the value of living in cultural contexts different from my own and of studying abroad, so I’m committed to supporting the Honda International Center’s endeavors.

At the end of October, I travelled to Japan with Takashi Miyaki, admissions specialist at Honda International Center. Our purpose was to visit schools that have established partnerships or that wish to establish partnerships with Kapi‘olani Community College. We also met with organizations that assist us in recruiting Japanese students. Takashi and our partners have been very successful in those efforts—so successful, in fact, that Kapi‘olani Community College enrolls more Japanese students than any other college in the USA.

We began in Kanazawa, where we met with officials from Kanazawa Gakuin Daigaku and its affiliated high school. The high school administrators are most interested in establishing short-term programs for their students. Over a dozen administrators and faculty from Kanazawa Gakuin listened to Takashi’s presentation and asked detailed questions both during the presentation and during the more informal debrief afterwards.

 

Prior to the meeting, we were escorted by Mr. Takuya, the Dean of Students at Kanazawa Gakuin Daigaku, who played tour guide for us to experience Kanazawa’s attractions.

Prior to the meeting, we were escorted by Mr. Takuya, the Dean of Students at Kanazawa Gakuin Daigaku, who played tour guide for us to experience Kanazawa’s attractions.

 

Kanazawa is famous for gold leaf. The gold leaf is produced in extremely thin sheets that need to be very carefully cut into precise squares. It can never be touched by bare fingers because it will stick to the person’s skin.

 

All the work is done using small instruments and the person’s breath.

All the work is done using small instruments and the person’s breath.

 

The gold leaf can be in or on anything, including tea and ice cream.

The gold leaf can be in or on anything, including tea and ice cream.

 

Kanazawa is an historic town, with many traditional buildings and occupations.

 

We walked through the geisha district, where even today, geisha entertain guests with music, poetry, and food.

We walked through the geisha district, where even today, geisha entertain guests with music, poetry, and food.

 

We visited a sake distillery and met Mr. Masatomi Kamiya, who is the 18th generation of his family to own and manage the distillery, which is now over 400 years old.

 

Mr. Kamiya showed us around his distillery, including the giant vessels that steam the rice.

Mr. Kamiya showed us around his distillery, including the giant vessels that steam the rice.

 

Mr. Kamiya showed us around his distillery, including the giant vessels that steam the rice. Over the next four days in Japan, we visited Kanto Gakuin and Mutsuura High School, where the school officials are eager to begin a partnership with Kapi‘olani Community College; officials with the EIKEN testing services, to sign an agreement for the next testing cycle at Kapi‘olani Community College; Meiji University, to re-sign an agreement and continue to explore new ways that we can build relationships, and the Hawaiian Education Center, where students and their parents were very enthusiastic about coming to Hawai‘i to study.

 

At Meiji University, Takashi also made presentations about Kapi‘olani Community College to students.

At Meiji University, Takashi also made presentations about Kapi‘olani Community College to students.

 

A visit to Japan would not be complete without an encounter with contemporary culture, including Godzilla.

 

A new Godzilla movie was playing at a movie theater near the APA Hotel, where we stayed. This creature was peeking over the top of the building next to the theater. You can see how big it is by looking at its size relative to the person standing behind the glass partition.

A new Godzilla movie was playing at a movie theater near the APA Hotel, where we stayed. This creature was peeking over the top of the building next to the theater. You can see how big it is by looking at its size relative to the person standing behind the glass partition.

 

We stayed in a section of Shinjuku called Kabukicho. If you Google it, you’ll see that it is a colorful area of town, full of shops and pachinko parlors. Takashi has a favorite Okinawan restaurant in a section of town called Golden Gai, which we visited.

 

There was room for six people at the counter, and we ate whatever the chef, seen here, prepared. Mama-san made culinary magic, cooking everything in the small space behind the sake bottles.

There was room for six people at the counter, and we ate whatever the chef, seen here, prepared. Mama-san made culinary magic, cooking everything in the small space behind the sake bottles.

 

In November, I travelled to Hong Kong, at the invitation of Dr. Jimmy Chan, Director of the Hong Kong Association for Conflict and Catastrophe Medicine. I was there to observe the two-day training program that was developed 12 years ago by Dr. Ed Kalinowski, who was then the Chair of Kapi‘olani Community College’s Emergency Medical Services Department. Even though he has retired from Kapi‘olani Community College, Dr. Kalinowski continues to deliver the twice yearly training to prepare medical staff in the techniques of Inter-Facility Critical Care Transport Medicine (ICCTM) with the assistance of three paramedics from Honolulu: Alan Young, Randal Tanaka, and Colin Wong.

Day 1 of the training includes didactic presentations followed by individual participants’ practicing hands-on skills at four stations: airway, pediatrics, infectious diseases, and communication, both written and two-way radio.

Day 2 gets much more exciting. The 40+ participants work in teams to respond to four scenarios. They get to use the skills they practiced in Day 1 in the context of emergency medicine, complete with taking care of manikin-patients while riding in the back of a moving ambulance.

 

Dr. Kalinowski explains the logistics of four teams doing four scenarios using two ambulances.

Dr. Kalinowski explains the logistics of four teams doing four scenarios using two ambulances.

 

Alan Young explains the case to the participants, most of whom were practicing nurses.

Alan Young explains the case to the participants, most of whom were practicing nurses.

 

Colin Wong watches as the participants assist the “patient” to breathe.

Colin Wong watches as the participants assist the “patient” to breathe.

 

Randal Tanaka adds some realism to the pediatric scenario.

Randal Tanaka adds some realism to the pediatric scenario.

 

The most complex case was the transport of a “patient” with infectious avian flu.

The most complex case was the transport of a “patient” with infectious avian flu.

 

Two teams prepare the “patients” with avian flu for transport to the hospital specializing in infectious diseases.

Two teams prepare the “patients” with avian flu for transport to the hospital specializing in infectious diseases.

 

The participants of 2016 ICCTM Class 4, their teachers, and me.

The participants of 2016 ICCTM Class 4, their teachers, and me.

 

At the end of it all, a ceremony to sign a renewed agreement between Kapi‘olani Community College and Dr. Jimmy Chan and the Hong Kong Association for Conflict and Catastrophe Medicine.

At the end of it all, a ceremony to sign a renewed agreement between Kapi‘olani Community College and Dr. Jimmy Chan and the Hong Kong Association for Conflict and Catastrophe Medicine.

 

As you can see, Kapi‘olani Community College has an extensive reach across the globe all the while maintaining its roots in the islands.

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